Researchers See Comeback For Europe’s Rare Animals

Sent! A link has been sent to your friend’s email address. Join the Nation’s Conversation To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs Researchers see comeback for Europe’s rare animals AP 1:02 p.m. EDT September 26, 2013 European bison also known as wisent, gather in the woods near Bad Berleburg, Germany in September. (Photo: Marius Becker, AP) Wild boars, greys wolves and white-tailed eagles have made a comeback in Europe Study claims dozens of species have been brought back from the brink of extinction Researchers noted that many of the 18 mammal and 19 bird species studied in the report remain in peril SHARECONNECT 19 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE BERLIN (AP) Wild boars, greys wolves and white-tailed eagles have made a comeback in Europe thanks to decades-long conservation efforts. A study published Thursday by the London Zoological Society claims dozens of species have been brought back from the brink of extinction and some are now thriving. Researchers from BirdLife International and the European Bird Census Council contributed to the study, which found that protecting habitats, restricting hunting, reducing pollution and the careful reintroduction were key to the species’ survival. The population of European bison, also known as wisent, has increased more than 3,000 percent since the 1950s, the study said. Still, researchers noted that many of the 18 mammal and 19 bird species studied in the report remain in peril. Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Europe stocks slip on U.S. debt fears

On Tuesday, Carnival laid out its profit expectations for the fourth quarter, which were below analysts forecasts. On a more upbeat note, shares of ThyssenKrupp AG /quotes/zigman/157034 DE:TKA -0.59% jumped 3.7% after European investor Cevian Capital said it has acquired a 5.2% stake in the German steelmaker. U.S. debt ceiling concerns More broadly, worries over the looming U.S. debt ceiling spilled over into Europe. The U.S. Treasury is set to reach its $16.7 trillion borrowing limit around mid-October, unless legislators move to raise the debt ceiling. Meanwhile, Congress has until the end of September to pass a federal budget to avoid the government shutting down and Moodys Investors Service warned on Tuesday that a failure to raise the debt limit would result in a worse outcome for financial markets than a government shutdown. The ratings agency argued that market participants would view a decision not to raise the debt limit as having a higher probability of sovereign default. As we have seen time and time again, markets are of the view that lawmakers will find another … makeshift solution which kicks the can further down the road, said Ishaq Siddiqi, market strategist at ETX Capital, in a note. But markets are too concerned with the question of how much could this impact U.S. economic growth while we witness a fragile recovery in play. If lawmakers fail to drum up a viable plan to raise the debt ceiling, it will be highly likely the Fed will refrain from tapering QE at least until December [at] the earliest.