Russia 2018: ‘we Have Nothing To Hide’ In World Cup Bid Investigation

She said that according to preliminary information no one among the embassy personnel was wounded. An attack last year in the city of Benghazi killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans in Libya last year. Meanwhile Libyan security officials say gunmen have shot dead a naval officer and his 7-year-old son in the eastern city of Benghazi. The officials said the gunmen fired Wednesday on the vehicle of Col. Saleh el-Hudeiry of the coast guards, killing him on the spot. The son was wounded and later died. Libya has been hit by a months-long wave of targeted killings against activists, judges and security agents. On Tuesday, an air force pilot was shot dead in the capital Tripoli. Most killings are presumed to be the work of armed factions, but authorities later apprehended a Russian woman whom they said had killed the pilot and written offensive graffiti in his blood. Her alleged motives were not clear. Officials spoke anonymously because they weren’t authorized to brief the media. 2013 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Russia charges all 30 Greenpeace activists with piracy

How and where Garcia’s potential meeting with Russia takes place is open to question given in April he was one of 18 people barred from entering the country over what Moscow said were human rights abuses, linked to the lawyer’s arrest and charging of Viktor Bout, a Russian, who is serving a 25-year prison sentence in the U.S. for arms trafficking. News of Garcia’s investigation came ahead of FIFA’s executive committee in Zurich on Thursday and Friday where it will discuss the possibility of moving the 2022 tournament from the usual June and July slot to December. “I will conduct interviews in various places and I hope that those who have some information, even if they are not obliged to give me some, will agree to talk to me,” Garcia told France Football magazine. “My goal is to submit a report that covers the World Cup bidding and awarding process.” Read: FIFA puts heat on Qatar Mark Pieth, who will leave his post as chairman of the Independent Governance Committee at the end of the year, said Garcia’s task isn’t easy. “He’s in a very awkward situation,” Pieth told CNN. “He has no police powers. He can’t just walk into an office in Dubai and say, ‘I want these files and I want all your hard disks.’ “He has to use the techniques of an international investigator and so the big question is, even if there’s evidence around, will he find it? We don’t know. What I can do is make sure he gets the manpower and he gets the resources, the money, to run this.” FIFA’s decision to award Qatar the 2022 tournament has been particularly criticized, with many suggesting the oppressive heat in the Gulf state makes staging the World Cup there impractical and dangerous. Pieth himself said he had “serious doubts” about the procedure used to give Qatar the event. Moving the competition from the northern hemisphere summer to winter could present a number of problems to the sport’s major leagues and major broadcasters.

Russia Enters New Era of Stagnation

The private investment needed to replace the government spending, he wrote, isnt coming, in part because investors have an “understandable lack of trust in public institutions.” Besides, private business has a hard time competing with state-owned behemoths: State-controlled banks, for example, hold 53 percent of the Russian economy’s entire loan portfolio. “We are at a crossroads,” Medvedev wrote. “Russia can continue going forward in slow motion, with economic growth close to zero, or it can take a serious step forward.” The second path “is fraught with risk,” while the first “leads to a precipice.” Few economists would argue with the diagnosis. “The head of the cabinet has largely learned to name the correct reasons for the country’s predicament,” Maxim Blant wrote on the opposition website ej.ru. Sergey Aleksashenko, director of macroeconomic studies at Moscow’s Higher School of Economics, agreed : “It’s a good thing that this has at least been said.” The biggest flaw in Medvedev’s lengthy program, critics said, was the paucity of solutions. All he offered was a slowdown in tariff increases at Russia’s state-owned utilities and some small-business support in the form of tax breaks, loans and government contracts. He also expounded on the need to turn Moscow into an international financial center. “And that’s it,” Aleksashenko wrote. “What about safeguarding property rights and the quality of the judicial system, shrinking the state and using government resources effectively, what about privatization and infrastructure?” Medvedev’s article does not contain the word “corruption” or mention capital flight, expected to reach $70 billion this year. It offers no specific measures to foster competition, the focus of the latest World Bank report on Russia. “Every month the Russian Statistics Committee surveys 25,000 entrepreneurs, trying to find out what obstacles they face, and every time they give the same answers: taxes, bureaucratic pressure, corruption,” Igor Nikolaev, head of strategic analysis at the audit firm FBK, told the web site Expert Online. “How long will the government close its eyes to that, merely pretending that it’s doing something?” Some worry that Russia could be entering a new era of stagnation — a term most associated with the tenure of former Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. “A crisis is a situation you can enter and exit, but stagnation is a situation with unpredictable consequences,” said Economics Minister Alexei Ulyukayev, according to Vedomosti. Both the economy and the bureaucracy seem to be running in place, with the latter unable to take the radical action needed to break the impasse. All power belongs to one man, President Vladimir Putin, who recently indicated that he intends to stay in power through 2024.

piracy committed by an organised group.” Piracy by an organised group carries a prison sentence of up to 15 years in Russia. Investigators accused the activists of trying to seize property with threats of violence. The first 14 activists were charged on Wednesday and the rest indicted Thursday. Greenpeace denies the crew members — who come from 18 different countries including Britain, Russia, New Zealand, Canada and France — committed any crime. “Our activists have been charged with a crime that did not happen,” Greenpeace International executive director Kumi Naidoo said in a statement. “A profound injustice is right now being perpetrated against our friends, our brothers and sisters, our sons and daughters who sit in Russian jails.” British Foreign Secretary William Hague has met with Greenpeace executive director John Sauven to discuss “the arrest of six British nationals,” his office said later Thursday. Hague last week raised the issue with Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov, it said. “We would remain in close contact with all other nations whose citizens were involved,” Hague was quoted as saying. Greenpeace spokesman Ben Ayliffe said one of the British activists had been taken ill prior to Thursday’s hearing. The September 18 protest saw several activists scale the oil platform in the Barents Sea to denounce Russia’s plans to drill in the Arctic. Russian border guards then lowered themselves onto the Dutch-flagged Arctic Sunrise from a helicopter, locked up the crew and towed the ship to Murmansk located nearly 2,000 kilometres north of Moscow. Among those charged on Thursday was Russian freelance photojournalist Denis Sinyakov, a former AFP and Reuters staff photographer. The Kremlin’s council on human rights, an advisory body, said it was “extremely concerned” that the journalist covering the protest for a Russian online portal had been accused of piracy. “We unambiguously consider the arrest and the laying of the piracy charges against Denis Sinyakov as pressure on the media,” it said.