The United States Opposes Democracy Worldwide

This report anticipates that more liquefied natural gas (LNG) export projects will be approved in the coming months. It notes a strong upside risk to forecasts stemming from the nineteen applications under review by the government (DoE) for non-FTA LNG exports. Natural gas consumption surged in the first three months of the year during snowstorm Nemo in the Northeast. However, over the second quarter, natural gas consumption has been tapered by higher natural gas prices (to a large extent a result of snowstorm Nemo), which prompted a swift switch by utilities to cheaper coal. The new natural gas price forecast for the Henry Hub price anticipates that prices will remain around current levels of US$4/mnBTU to 2015, after which point the combination of ramp up of LNG exports and a large influx of new petrochemicals complexes will alter the dynamics creating a push-pull environment that will result in a new, higher price equilibrium of around US$7mnBTU. Complete report is available at http://www.marketreportsonline.com/274397.html . United States Metals Report Q4 2013 research’s forecasts across the refined metals sector in the US remain tepid as the country’s economic recovery remains steady but less than robust, and as the long-term trend of declining consumption and metal intensity per unit of economic grow continue to play out. In the short term, this report expects refiners and metal producers to continue bringing production back online as the country’s economic outlook improves, particularly in the construction and automotive sectors. That said, production and consumption will likely remain below pre-crisis levels as Chinese growth slows in H213, eurozone demand remains weak, and inventories stay elevated. Complete report is available at http://www.marketreportsonline.com/274396.html . This research forecasts that slow but steady growth in the metals sector will roughly track broader GDP growth, which is forecast to average 2.4% from 2013 to 2017.

United States Q4 2013 Reports on Metals & Oil and Gas Now Available at MarketReportsOnline.com

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instigated a coup that temporarily deposed the late Hugo Chavez, Maduros predecessor, in 2002. In the eleven years since, Washington has continued to fund opponents of the revolution and foment strikes, demonstrations and general unrest. Such interference is the pattern of U.S. foreign policy. Profits of investors are preeminent and any person or movement seeking to take control of resources for the popular good is branded an enemy and treated as such. The following examples are just the tip of the imperial iceberg: Iran, 1953: The CIA helped overthrow the popular anti-monarchist Mohammad Mossadegh, largely because he nationalized Irans vast oil resources, and replaced him with the Shah. Oil reserves were returned to Western control and 26 years of despotic rule followed; Guatemala, 1954: The U.S. overthrew the democratically elected Jacobo Arbenz and soon turned Guatemala into killing fields. Earlier this year, former dictator Efrain Rios Montt was convicted of genocide by a Guatemalan court. Those in the U.S. who made the killing possible and profited most from it, however, remain at large; Vietnam, 1950s: After the Geneva accords of 1954 set up elections to unify Vietnam, the U.S. spent the ensuing years making sure no elections were held, knowing Ho Chi Minh would win in a landslide. Twenty years later, after American forces had killed four million people and destroyed three countries, the Vietnamese drove the U.S.

U.S. states see public sector job losses in August

Over the year, the entire government sector loss 94,000 jobs. “In general, governments have been slashing jobs and the private sector has been picking up the slack,” said Brent Campbell, who follows U.S. regional trends as an associate economist for Moody’s Analytics. In Wisconsin, where the jobless rate ticked down to 6.7 percent in August from 6.8 percent in July, the private sector added 7,300 jobs, mostly in construction. Local government, meanwhile, lost 1,200 positions, according to the state’s employment department. Maryland, where the federal government is a large employer and contractor, is also seeing strength in the private sector. The state gained 9,700 jobs in August from July, and its unemployment rate dropped to 7 percent from 7.1 percent. “Today’s jobs report also reaffirms the strength of Maryland’s dynamic private sector. Over the past 12 months, our businesses have created 37,800 jobs – nearly nine out of every 10 new jobs created in our state,” Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley said in a statement on Friday. In neighboring Virginia, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 5.8 percent from 5.7 percent in July. Both the private and public sectors in the state lost jobs, but the losses in total government equaled 1,100, compared with 800 jobs shed in areas such as trade and transportation, construction and manufacturing, according to a state report also released on Friday. JOBS TERRAIN The labor department data also showed the jobs terrain was still uneven among the states in August. Jobless rates rose from the month before in 18 states and the District of Columbia, dropped in 17 and remained the same in 15. From August 2012, unemployment rates dropped in 36 states and the District of Columbia, rose in 12 and were unchanged in Arizona and Oklahoma.