Wembley Interested In London Nfl Franchise, Super Bowl

Sputtering Vikings hope losing will stop in London, as team tries to reverse course overseas

Heavy smoke rises from the Westgate Mall in Nairobi Kenya Monday Sept. 23 2013. Multiple large blasts have rocked the mall where a hostage siege is in its third day. Associated Press reporters on the scene heard multiple blasts and a barrage of gunfire. Security forces have been attempting to rescue an unknown number of hostages inside the mall held by al-Qaida-linked terrorists.  (AP Photo/ Jerome Delay)

Sunday’s game matches a pair of 0-3 clubs. The “core fan base” in the U.K. is now more than 2 million, according to Chris Parsons, the NFL’s senior vice president of international. That’s more than double the figure when the league first brought regular-season games to Wembley in 2007, but still not high enough for a franchise here to be sustainable. “We’ve doubled our fan base in the last 3 1-2 to four years,” Parsons said. “I’d like to see that at least double again in the next three or four years. That would put us among the top five sports in the U.K. in terms of core fan base.” While having a full-time franchise in London is still “clearly an option” for the NFL, Parsons cautioned that there are no immediate plans. “There are several steps we need to continue to take before we get to that deeper conversation,” Parsons said. “We’d like to play more games every year as we move forward. … Once you’ve got a sizeable fan base, the options are then much more available to you to do certain things.” Even if it doesn’t get a full-time franchise, Wembley has its sights set on another major target: hosting a Super Bowl. That is, if the league ever decides to move its showcase game abroad. “They are a very progressive organization so long, long, long term they might consider (a Super Bowl in London), but it’s a hell of a call,” Maslin said of the NFL.

“I’d like to see that at least double again in the next three or four years. That would put us among the top five sports in the U.K. in terms of core fan base.” While having a full-time franchise in London is still “clearly an option” for the NFL, Parsons cautioned that there are no immediate plans. “There are several steps we need to continue to take before we get to that deeper conversation,” Parsons said. “We’d like to play more games every year as we move forward. … Once you’ve got a sizeable fan base, the options are then much more available to you to do certain things.” Even if it doesn’t get a full-time franchise, Wembley has its sights set on another major target: hosting a Super Bowl. That is, if the league ever decides to move its showcase game abroad. “They are a very progressive organization so long, long, long term they might consider (a Super Bowl in London), but it’s a hell of a call,” Maslin said of the NFL. “Absolutely … if they bring it anywhere in the world we want it here at Wembley.” Copyright 2013 Associated Press . All rights reserved.

London Fund Managers More Optimistic About Economy, Survey Shows

Stay confident and keep swinging, but swinging a lot better. I feel like we will approach it with that mindset and attitude, and well be OK. Since his 78-yard touchdown run on Minnesotas first snap, Peterson is averaging only 2.99 yards per attempt. The offensive line has had trouble protecting quarterback Christian Ponder, too; six of their 10 sacks allowed this year came by the Browns. Pro Bowl fullback Jerome Felton has returned to the active roster this week following his three-game suspension, so his presence ought to help. To make room for him, the Vikings placed rookie fullback Zach Line on injured reserve. Obviously its not just me coming back thats going to make the running game do what it needs to do, but I definitely think I can help and contribute, Felton said. We dont have time for it to take a few weeks. Ive got to hit the ground running. The Vikings had three turnovers against the Browns to go with six three-and-out possessions. The defense has eight takeaways over the last two games, a wasted accomplishment. Ponder isnt the only problem, but he has seven of the teams 10 giveaways and a persistence of off-target throws on critical plays. You cant turn the ball over at the rate that were turning it over and expect to win, unless Ive said this before youre so superior to your opponents, coach Leslie Frazier said. And were not. There are plenty of issues on the other side of the ball, too, beginning with the quiet pass rush from a defensive line thats supposed to be one of the teams true strengths. The biggest concern this week, though, is depth at defensive back. Cornerbacks Chris Cook (groin) and A.J. Jefferson (ankle) and safety Jamarca Sanford (hamstring) were scheduled for MRI tests Monday.

Eighty-two percent of 200 investors and analysts polled expect the economy to improve over the next 12 months, up from 69 percent a year earlier, London-based Capital Spreads said today. The survey also showed that 62 percent view the recovery as sustainable and not built on an artificial housing boom. The Bank of England said last week that the recovery is taking hold and increased its growth forecast for this quarter to 0.7 percent from 0.5 percent. The nine-member Monetary Policy Committee unanimously agreed at its meeting this month that the economy currently requires no more stimulus, and policy maker Ben Broadbent said yesterday recent data has been strong. Investors are beginning to see some light at the end of what has been a very long and jet-black tunnel, said Nick Lewis, head of trading and market risk at Capital Spreads. It remains to be seen whether this is more than a housing bubble, but the City seems cautiously optimistic. Government initiatives to boost mortgage availability have drawn criticism for potentially stoking the property market too much. A gauge of house prices by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors rose to the highest in almost seven years in August. In a sign that some investors remain cautious, 30 percent of those polled said the U.K. economy is a bubble based on a housing boom, though they expect it to grow for the foreseeable future. Of the 200 respondents, 6 percent forecast that the economy will weaken over the coming 12 months, down from 8 percent a year earlier. The poll was conducted by Populus from Sept. 3 to Sept. 10 for Capital Spreads, the spread-betting unit of London Capital Group Holdings Plc.